Skin Bleaching Surgery – Lasers and Freezing

In some cases, such as large moles, discolored scar tissue, birthmarks, and other skin blemishes, simple creams and topical agents may not be enough to lighten the blemish. Whether you have tried homemade skin bleaching recipes, over the counter creams, or prescription medications, when nothing else works, there are surgical procedures. Skin bleaching surgery sounds intimidating, but the most common procedures are non-invasive. In fact, most skin bleaching surgery can be done on an outpatient basis. You can have skin bleaching surgery on your lunch break from work, on your day off, or at another convenient time without worry over time lost from work or family. There is virtually no recovery time for skin bleaching surgery.

Primarily, there are two forms of skin bleaching surgery. There are laser peels, often performed by dermatologists, cosmetic surgeons, or general practitioners. Cryosurgery[1] is another form of skin bleaching surgery that involves freezing the affected area using liquid nitrogen[3]. Both forms of skin bleaching surgery are safe and effective for the removal of moles, large freckles, liver spots, and other dark patches of skin. Whether your skin condition is simply melasma[2], or if it is chloasma or solar lentigenes, skin bleaching surgery can be used to correct it.

Laser peels and cryosurgery are most often sought after other methods have failed. Typically, in cases of freckles, for example, the patient has tried to lighten the area at home. When that failed, they discussed options with their doctor who prescribed a topical formulation. It is when these methods fail that most patients turn to skin bleaching surgery. However, skin bleaching surgery does not have to be a last ditch resort in all cases. For example, a large discolored mole might be best handled by using skin bleaching surgery first.

No matter what brings you to the choice of using skin bleaching surgery, there are some side effects and precautions to consider. For example, with laser peels the procedure may need to be repeated to obtain the best outcome. Both laser peels and cryosurgery can result in mild skin irritation, as well as peeling of the skin. This is normal, and even happens with topical skin bleaching agents. Peeling and irritated skin is a common side effect of virtually every form of skin bleaching. However, overly irritated skin or excessive peeling should be examined by a medical professional to ensure there is no risk of infection or other complications.

Emily Peetlukes

Contributor: Emily Peetlukes (The Beauty Insiders)

This Article Has Been Published on October 26, 2010 and Last Modified on January 3, 2019

Emily is a dreamer who was born to run wild and free; a traveler who is always on the move collecting research and experiences from different people and cultures from all over the world. Her love of writing comes naturally, and she finds it a great way to share stories, advice and information from her life experiences. Emily is a certified life coach, a dating expert and has a wide range of knowledge from health and fitness, adventure and traveling, sex and relationships as well as beauty and culture. She hopes to continue to share her passion of writing with the world through future projects including books, novels, articles and blogs. Follow her on Instagram and Facebook.

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